The Last Stop.

It had long since been decided that New York should be the last stop of our year-long adventure. For Nick we had to literally circumnavigate the globe in order to say we had been around the world. It wasn’t the easiest or indeed cheapest way back to the UK from New Zealand but the little matter of a 36 hour aeroplane journey wasn’t going to stop the Johnsons.

New York, New York. The Big Apple. So good they named it twice. Concrete jungle where dreams are made. New York’s reputation certainly precedes her and my expectations were huge. We got a taxi from the airport, yellow, naturally, and made our way towards Manhattan through the rush hour traffic. The oh so familiar skyline silhouetted against a fabulous sunset. I was buzzing with excitement. But after our epic flight and crossing the international date line our exploration of New York would have to wait.

The next morning we woke up in the city that never sleeps. We’ll have to take their word for it though as we all enjoyed a solid 12 hours kip. We consumed our first cliché of the day by breakfasting on bagels and coffee before heading out to see the sights. Our hotel was just off Fifth Avenue and our aim was to make the obligatory pilgrimage to the American Museum of Natural History to check out the dinosaurs. New York had other ideas.

Although this was my first time there, as the back drop to thousands of movies and TV series, New York was immediately familiar. I walked along her Avenues in awe, making frequent stops to ogle her architecture, with a pervasive sense of deja vu and a suitable soundtrack running through my head. New York is such a ubiquitous part of popular culture that I spent the duration of our stay feeling like I was in a movie.

We eventually made it to Central Park and sat on a bench eating a hot dog we’d bought from a vendor with a striped umbrella. I had to pinch myself with the surrealness of it. We soaked up the atmosphere, watched street performers and fell in love with the vibrant fall colours while the boys clamboured on the famed rocks. We were so waylaid that the afternoon had run away and our trip to the museum would have to wait. Much to George’s chagrin. That evening we ate pizza at a quaint little Italian restaurant in Greenwich village with checked table cloths and a brash waitress. And I pinched myself again.

The next day was Halloween and after a morning with the dinosaurs we went in search of some costumes. We were invited to Trick or Treat with a New York family we’d met in Japan and needed to get into the spirit of things. Macy’s. Bloomingdales. JC Penny. Nothing. We ended up with two very happy boys Star Wars-ed up to the nines thanks to the Disney Store. And a couple of zombie parents thanks to some fake blood and make-up at our friends’ house. The enthusiasm with which Brooklyn celebrated Halloween was infectious. Everyone in costume, decorated houses, a suitably spooky spectacle put on a stage outside someone’s house. Even the local dentist was giving out candy (well, thats one way to drum up business). Later we took the subway home along with a human Watermelon, a Goat-man and all of the Ghostbusters. That evening will remain one of the highlights of our entire trip.

Over the next couple of days we whistled through our Big Apple hit list. We took a walk over Brooklyn Bridge and rode the Subway back again. We thought about taking a helicopter ride to see the Statue of Liberty for about 30 seconds before the fear of the credit card bill got the better of us and we opted to take the (free) Statten Island Ferry instead. We walked through Battery Park and had a go on the Sea Glass Carousel. We stood in quiet contemplation at the 9/11 Memorial and tried to convey what it meant to the children. We rode in a horse-drawn carriage around Central Park. We saw a show on Broadway and Nick ate a mac n cheese burger that was bigger than his head. We strolled the high-line with a dear old friend who now calls New York home. We stood inside Grand Central Station and I was moved to tears.

On our last night in New York as I looked down on the dizzy heights of NYC from the Empire State Building I thought of everywhere we had been and all the things we had done. All the people we had met and all of the places we’d slept in the past year. 24 hours later we would be back in our house in Brighton but it felt good to know that as long as the four of us were together, anywhere in the world, we would always be home.

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Our six month travelversary

About this time last year we made a decision that led us to where we are today. There’s no way we could have predicted on that bright and breezy day in Brighton that a year hence we’d be in South Korea but here we are exactly six months since we landed in Delhi and what a ride we’ve had! 

  

We are often asked whether it is difficult to travel with young children. Usually the question is posed by young travellers who don’t have kids. My stock answer is that life with children is life with children. We have the same issues on the road that we’d have at home: disagreements over screen time (George), drama over getting dressed (Tomas), refusal to get a haircut (both) and I still often impale my foot on lego when I go to the loo at 3am.

  

We’ve mediated sibling squabbles at the Taj Mahal and the Great Wall of China. Their clothes always need washing and they need to eat all the bloody time. But that’s life with children! Now they have six months travel under their belts the boys are seasoned travellers. They can sleep anywhere, greet the locals in their lingo and ‘Home’ is wherever we drop our backpacks. 

  

We have continued with our nightly ritual of sharing a highlight (or highlike as T calls them). As we approached the half way point  of our adventure we reflected on all we have done so far. Trying to nail down a highlight from each of us for the past six months was tricky but here they are:

  

Nick has really enjoyed having time together as a family and we both agree that trekking in the Himalayas was the high point of our journey so far. 

  

I have also loved making new friends, spending time with old ones and eating all the food!

  

For George it was the camel trek we did in Jaisalmer and eating scorpion in Beijing of course!

  

Tomas has enjoyed seeing rabbits in all the countries we’ve visited and the pony trek he did on his birthday in Nepal.

  

Together we have experienced more of the world (and each other) in six months than we’d have managed in 10 years of family holidays and for that we feel truly blessed. Here’s to the next six months there’s no knowing where they may lead!

  

 

 

And just like that Christmas is over

I haven’t missed all the Christmas hype at home in England. It begins sometime in October and builds momentum until the children are in complete frenzy come December 25th.

You could be forgiven for the big day passing you by entirely here in South Goa. There were some children on the beach trying to sell us their handmade cards (the snowmen seemed particularly incongruous). The boys helped decorate the tree at our guesthouse. There are a few detailed nativity scenes around complete with

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living grass and flowers. And a few restaurants even offered roast turkey dinners but that’s about it.

The boys slept until 7.45. A lay-in by any standard and completely unheard of on Christmas Day! (being woken around 5am by my niece running in to our room yelling “It’s Christmas!!” will remain one of my favourite festive memories).

As soon as his eyes were open Tomas asked “has Santa been?!” and after checking whether Rudolph had eaten the carrot we’d left out for him the boys had a jolly few minutes opening their stockings containing a couple of trinkets and some sweets.

They were delighted with their presents of Shreddies (for Tomas who has asked for them everyday since we left Brighton) and a snorkel (for George who wrote a beautiful letter requesting one upon our arrival in Goa). The usual chaos of mountains of gifts and tantrums over wanting more presents to open happily passed us by (mind you there were tears over both boys wanting the chameleon toy which went missing later that day sparing us from further dispute).

We did miss our family and friends and a paper hat would have been nice as we ate our seafood dinner (and did the quiz) with an old friend but we have all become accustomed to living with fewer possessions and I hope we remember the beauty of this Christmas without ‘stuff’.

Christmas Quiz

We have a family tradition (that started 7 years ago when Nick and I had our first Christmas together) – a Christmas quiz that we send to family all over the world. The idea being that whoever is with them for Christmas will join in round the table and then we get to speak with family members as they phone in the results.

Please find the quiz below – should you wish to join in. Answers below – no cheating! Let us know how you got on!

We wish you a wonderful day!

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By the way the winner sets the questions the following year so these are curtesy of my step dad Jim!

1) the Bing Crosby song White Christmas originally came from which 1942 film?

2) which year was the first Band Aid ‘do they know it’s Christmas’ song made?

3) who is Aladdin’s mum ? (Oh no it isn’t !)

4) the season before Easter is known as Lent….but what is the season before Christmas known as?

5) Boxing Day is also known as which Saints feast day? Is it
St Mark…St Nicholas or St Stephen?

6) who composed the music for the Nutcracker?

7) Christmas Island is the territory of which country?

8) What colour underwear do Mexicans wear on New Years Eve to bring good luck for the coming year?

9) What are traditionally the names of the Three Kings/Wise Men/Magi who brought gifts to the baby Jesus ? ….a point for each name and a bonus point if you know the ‘fourth kings name’ in literature.

10) in which country (the world’s seventh largest) is Christmas known as Bada Din or ‘Big Day’?

11) what year was the film ‘Zulu’ released?

12) Father Christmas’ home in the North Pole is in which Ocean?

13) St Nicholas’ birthplace is in which country?
Turkey, Germany or Russia

14) Nadolig Llawen is Merry Christmas in which Western European language?

15) which year was the first King’s Speech broadcast by radio?

16) In the 1946 film ‘It’s a wonderful life’ what is the name of George Bailey’s guardian angel?

17) What was the occupation of the inventor of the Christmas Cracker?
Butcher, Baker or Lawyer?

18) Viscum Album is the technical name for…. Mistletoe , Holly or Poinsettia ?

19) In the carol ‘ the twelve days of Christmas’ how many pipers were piping?
Bonus point to anyone who can sing the whole carol without looking up the words (performance must be videod )

20) The famous song ‘O Christmas Tree’ was originally sung in which language? (Bonus point for knowing which socialist song is set to the same tune).

Scroll down for answers…

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Answers…

1. Holiday Inn

2. 1984

3. Widow Twankey (oh yes it is!)

4. Advent

5. St Stephen

6. Tchaikovsky

7. Australia

8. Red

9. Melchior, Caspar, and Balthazar (One Point for each) And a bonus point for ‘Artaban’ the fourth king in Henry van Dyke’s book in 1895.

10. India……bonus point for actually being in India!

11. 1964……they had a ‘premiere’ showing earlier this year to mark the fiftieth anniversary.

12. The Arctic Ocean

13. Turkey

14. Danish …………Naaaaa Only joking..It’s Welsh…

15. 1932

16. Clarence

17. Baker

18. Mistletoe

19. Eleven

20. German (O Tannenbaum)…….and ‘the Red Flag’ is the socialist song for a last bonus.